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New ETF Offers Exposure to Emerging Markets Excluding China
NEW YORK, Sept. 2, 2015, Emerging Global Advisors (EGA) today launched its EGShares EM Core ex-China exchange-traded fund (ETF). The new fund (TICKER: XCEM) provides broad exposure to emerging markets excluding China and Hong Kong, allowing investors to preserve or supplement emerging market portfolios without increasing their exposure to China.
“In today’s market environment, some investors have noted that China comprises a significant portion of broad-based emerging market benchmarks. That portion is growing as index funds in the category plan to increase their allocations to China through A-shares,” said EGA President and Founder Robert C. Holderith. “We launched XCEM to deliver core emerging market exposure independently of China, giving investors an option to refine their portfolios in light of other China holdings or market developments.”
XCEM tracks the EGAI Emerging Markets ex-China Index. The index is free-floating, market cap-weighted and ranked in line with broad-based, market cap-weighted conventional indices. It provides exposure to 20 countries, including South Korea, Taiwan, Brazil, India and South Africa.
“The XCEM fund is a strong fit for investors who are looking to be more conservative in their approach to China without sacrificing opportunities in other emerging markets,” said EGA Managing Director Jay McAndrew. “It also addresses the needs of investors who have a point of view on China and are looking for greater control over the size and style of their exposure to this market.”
About Emerging Global Advisors
Emerging Global Advisors (EGA) is a leading provider of strategic beta portfolios in emerging markets and we employ a disciplined, rules-based investment process rooted in research and portfolio strategy. Our investment strategies, including our EGShares suite of ETFs, are designed to help investors generate alpha within their emerging and frontier market allocations. We offer core equity, thematic and equity income emerging and frontier market exposures.
EGA Indices (EGAI), a separate group within EGA, develops strategic beta indices for emerging market exposure.
Disclosures
Carefully consider the Fund’s investment objectives, risk factors and charges and expenses before investing. This and other information can be found in the Fund’s prospectus, which may be obtained by calling + 1 888 800 4347 or by visiting the Fund’s website egshares.com to view or download a prospectus. Read the prospectus carefully before investing. Investing involves risk, including possible loss of principal.
Emerging market investments involve risk of capital loss from unfavorable fluctuation in currency values, from differences in generally accepted accounting principles, from economic or political instability in other nations or increased volatility and lower trading volume. This Fund will concentrate its investments in issuers of one or more particular industries to the same extent that its Underlying Index is so concentrated and to the extent permitted by applicable regulatory guidance. Concentration risk results from maintaining exposure to issuers conducting business in a specific industry. Small-cap and mid-cap companies generally will have greater volatility in price than the stocks of large companies due to limited product lines or resources or a dependency upon a particular market niche. One cannot invest directly in an index.
ETF shares are bought and sold at market price (not NAV) and are not individually redeemed from the Fund.
Robert Holderith and Jay McAndrew are registered representatives of ALPS Distributors, Inc.
EGA and EGShares Funds are distributed by ALPS Distributors, Inc. Emerging Global Advisors acts as the investment advisor to the Fund. ALPS and Emerging Global Advisors are unaffiliated entities.
© 2015 Emerging Global Advisors, LLC. All rights reserved. EGA®, EGShares℠ and EGAI℠ are service marks of Emerging Global Advisors, LLC. All other trademarks, service marks or registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
CONTACT:
Steven Bodakowski
JCPR
(646) 922-7773
sbodakowski@jcprinc.com

SOURCE:
Emerging Global Advisors

A “financialist” versus an “economist”

According to Dr. Anthony Criniti, a “financialist” and an “economist” are two distinct terms. His definitions are below for your convenience:

“A financialist is a scientist who specializes in the science of finance.” (Criniti, The Necessity of Finance, 25)

Conversely,

“The science of economics has a name for its specialists called economists.” (Criniti, The Necessity of Finance, 25)

For more information, please read Dr. Criniti’s The Necessity of Finance.

Source:

Criniti, Anthony M. IV, The Necessity of Finance: An Overview of the Science of Management of Wealth for an Individual, a Group, or an Organization (Philadelphia: Criniti Publishing, 2013).

American Psychological Association Survey Shows Money Stress Weighing on Americans’ Health Nationwide

Stress in America™ survey finds parents, younger generations and lower-income households have higher stress than others overall

WASHINGTON, February 4, 2015, While aspects of the U.S. economy have improved, money continues to be a top cause of stress for Americans, according to the new Stress in America™: Paying With Our Health survey released today by the American Psychological Association. According to the survey, parents, younger generations and those living in lower-income households report higher levels of stress than Americans overall, especially when it comes to stress about money.

“Regardless of the economic climate, money and finances have remained the top stressor since our survey began in 2007. Furthermore, this year’s survey shows that stress related to financial issues could have a significant impact on Americans’ health and well-being,” APA CEO and Executive Vice President Norman B. Anderson, PhD, said.

The survey, which was conducted by Harris Poll on behalf of APA among 3,068 adults in August 2014, found that 72 percent of Americans reported feeling stressed about money at least some of the time during the past month. Twenty-two percent said that they experienced extreme stress about money during the past month (an 8, 9 or 10 on a 10-point scale, where 1 is “little or no stress” and 10 is “a great deal of stress”). For the majority of Americans (64 percent), money is a somewhat or very significant source of stress, but especially for parents and younger adults (77 percent of parents, 75 percent of millennials [18 to 35 years old] and 76 percent of Gen Xers [36 to 49 years old]).

A gap also appears to be emerging in stress levels between people living in lower-income (making less than $50,000 per year) and higher-income households that mirrors the growing wealth gap nationwide. In 2007, there was no difference in reported average stress levels between those who earned more and those who earned less than $50,000, with both groups reporting the same average levels of stress (6.2 on a 10-point scale). By 2014, a clear gap had emerged with those living in lower-income households reporting higher overall stress levels than those living in higher-income households (5.2 vs. 4.7 on the 10-point scale).

Stress about money and finances appears to have a significant impact on many Americans’ lives. Some are putting their health care needs on hold because of financial concerns. Nearly 1 in 5 Americans say that they have either considered skipping (9 percent) or skipped (12 percent) going to the doctor when they needed health care because of financial concerns. Stress about money also impacts relationships: Almost a third of adults with partners (31 percent) report that money is a major source of conflict in their relationship.

The report also uncovered good news about stress management. Americans who say they have someone they can ask for emotional support, such as family and friends, report lower stress levels and better related outcomes than those without emotional support. Unfortunately, some Americans say that they do not have anyone to rely on for emotional support. According to the survey, 43 percent of those who say they have no emotional support report that their overall stress has increased in the past year, compared with 26 percent of those who say they have emotional support.

On average, Americans’ stress levels are trending downward: The average reported stress level is 4.9 on a 10-point scale, down from 6.2 in 2007. Regardless of lower stress levels, it appears that Americans are living with stress levels higher than what we believe to be healthy — 3.7 on a 10-point scale — and some (22 percent) say they are not doing enough to manage their stress.

“This year’s survey continues to reinforce the idea that we are living with a level of stress that we consider too high,” Anderson said. “Despite the good news that overall stress levels are down, it appears that the idea of living with stress higher than what we believe to be healthy and dealing with it in ineffective ways continues to be embedded in our culture. All Americans, and particularly those groups that are most affected by stress — which include women, younger adults and those with lower incomes — need to address this issue sooner than later in order to better their health and well-being.”

To read the full Stress in America report or download graphics, visit the webpage.

For additional information on stress, lifestyle and behaviors, visit the APA Help Center webpage and read APA’s Mind/Body Health campaign blog. Join the conversation about stress on Twitter by following @APAHelpCenter and #stressAPA.

Methodology

The Stress in America survey was conducted online within the United States by Harris Poll on behalf of the American Psychological Association between Aug. 4 and 29, 2014, among 3,068 adults ages 18 and older who reside in the U.S. Because the sample is based on those who were invited and agreed to participate in the Harris Poll online research panel, no estimates of theoretical sampling error can be calculated. To read the full methodology, including the weighting variables, visit the Stress in America Press Room webpage.

The American Psychological Association, in Washington, D.C., is the largest scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States. APA’s membership includes nearly 130,000 researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants and students. Through its divisions in 54 subfields of psychology and affiliations with 60 state, territorial and Canadian provincial associations, APA works to advance the creation, communication and application of psychological knowledge to benefit society and improve people’s lives.

 

 

SOURCE:

 

APA

http://www.apa.org

J.P. Morgan’s 5 Resolutions for Your Retirement Plan

NEW YORK, Jan. 2, 2015, The beginning of the new year is a great time to check in on your retirement savings plan, according to J.P. Morgan Asset Management Chief Retirement Strategist Katherine Roy.  The firm has shared 5 tips for individuals to consider heading into 2015.

  1.  Know where you stand

“Whether you’re nearing retirement or still several decades away, it’s important to know where you stand now,” says Katherine. Find out if you’re on track with J.P. Morgan’s Guide to Retirement savings checkpoint: http://bit.ly/jpm_gtr_check

  1.  15 is the new 10

The single most important thing you can do is to target saving at least 15% of your gross annual income (before taxes) each and every year. Katherine offers these tips to help avoid “undersaving” and maximize your savings potential:

  • Pay yourself first with automatic deductions from each paycheck, so you are benefitting from dollar cost averaging throughout the year.
  • Max out on employer retirement plans – such as 401(k), 403(b) and 457 plans. The 15% target includes your employer match.
  • If you aren’t covered by an employer plan, be sure to make your IRA contribution. If you are, consider a non-tax-deductible contribution to shelter more long-term income for income tax purposes.
  • Don’t forget to take advantage of catch-up contributions if you’re age 50 or over.
  • Get a better grasp of your spending behavior. The less you spend, the more you can save and invest.

Take a look at the chart to better understand the benefit of saving early from J.P. Morgan’s Guide to Retirement: http://bit.ly/jpm_gtr_saveearly

  1.  How you invest matters

How you invest will have a large impact on how much you have at retirement. No matter how much you save, investing in a portfolio that is too conservative is likely to lead to a poor outcome. “You can’t count on unrealistic investment returns to make up for saving too little,” says Katherine. “Maintaining a disciplined, balanced saving and investment strategy is critical.” And, now is a good time to take stock of how your retirement portfolio is allocated. http://bit.ly/jpm_gtr_returns

  1. Prepare to pay more for health care in retirement

The estimated annual out-of-pocket health care costs for the average 65-year-old retiree is currently about $4,000 a year and, in 20 years, is projected to grow to more than $10,000. For someone with high prescription expenses, those costs are around $7,000 per year, projected to grow to more than $14,000 in 30 years. http://bit.ly/jpm_gtr_hccosts

Katherine advises, “ensure your retirement portfolio is positioned for this growing expense. With health care costs rising faster than inflation, we recommend planning for 7% to account for both health care inflation as well as higher spending on health care costs as you age.”

  1. Consider delaying Social Security

As you can see in the chart, for every year you delay taking Social Security beyond your full retirement age (age 66 for those born 1943-1954; age 67 for those born in 1960 or after), you can expect an 8% per year increase in benefits up until age 70. If you can’t wait until age 70, at least hold off until your full retirement age. “If you start taking benefits earlier than full retirement age, you’ll not only lock in reduced benefits for your lifetime, but benefits to your survivors could also be significantly reduced,” says Katherine. http://bit.ly/jpm_gtr_delay

A well-informed plan can help take some of the emotion out of saving and investing. Work with a financial advisor who can help you develop a plan and course correct along the way. Katherine recommends, “Meet with your financial advisor at least annually to ensure your retirement plan stays on track.”

About J.P. Morgan Asset Management – Retirement

J.P. Morgan Retirement, part of J.P. Morgan Asset Management, is a leading provider of comprehensive retirement solutions and is dedicated to improving individual retirement outcomes. The group has defined contribution assets under management of nearly $135 billion, as of September 30, 2014.

About J.P. Morgan Asset Management

J.P. Morgan Asset Management, with assets under management of $1.6 trillion, is a global leader in investment management. J.P. Morgan Asset Management’s clients include institutions, retail investors and high net worth individuals in every major market throughout the world.  J.P. Morgan Asset Management offers global investment management in equities, fixed income, real estate, hedge funds, private equity and liquidity.  JPMorgan Chase & Co. (NYSE: JPM), the parent company of J.P. Morgan Asset Management, is a leading global asset management firm with assets of approximately $2.4 trillion and operations in more than 60 countries.  Information about JPMorgan Chase & Co. is available at www.jpmorganchase.com

 

SOURCE:

J.P. Morgan Asset Management http://www.jpmorganchase.com

 

Americans’ Personal Finance Sentiment Strengthens, Housing Optimism Follows Suit

Confidence in Home Selling Environment Hits New Survey High

WASHINGTON, Nov. 7, 2014, Results from Fannie Mae’s October 2014 National Housing Survey show Americans’ optimism about the housing market continued its gradual climb amid greater confidence in household income and personal finances. The share of respondents who say they expect their personal financial situation to improve during the next 12 months climbed to 45 percent – seven points higher compared to one year ago – while the share expecting their financial situation to worsen decreased to 10 percent last month. Although consumer attitudes about the direction of the economy remain subdued, with only 40 percent of survey respondents saying the economy is on the right track, the October results mark a 13 percentage point improvement compared to the same time last year.

“Consumers are growing more optimistic about the housing market in the face of broader improvement in economic sentiment,” said Doug Duncan, senior vice president and chief economist at Fannie Mae. “The share of consumers who expect their personal finances to get better is near its highest level since the survey’s inception, while those expecting their finances to get worse reached a survey low. Home price expectations rose significantly this month, largely reversing the dip witnessed over the past four months, and the share of consumers who think it’s a good time to sell a home reached another survey high. The narrowing gap between home buying and home selling sentiment may foreshadow increased housing inventory levels and a better balance of housing supply and demand. These results may help drive a healthier housing market in 2015.”

SURVEY HIGHLIGHTS

Homeownership and Renting

  • The average 12-month home price change expectation rose to 2.8 percent.
  • The share of respondents who say home prices will go up in the next 12 months fell by one point to 44 percent. The share who say home prices will go down decreased by one point to 7 percent.
  • The share of respondents who say mortgage rates will go up in the next 12 months rose by three percentage points to 48 percent.
  • Those who say it is a good time to buy a house fell to 65 percent. Those who say it is a good time to sell increased to 44 percent—a new all-time survey high.
  • The average 12-month rental price change expectation rose to 3.7 percent.
  • The percentage of respondents who expect home rental prices to go up in the next 12 months decreased by six percentage points to 49 percent.
  • The share of respondents who think it would be difficult to get a home mortgage today increased by two percentage points.
  • The share who say they would buy if they were going to move fell to 65 percent, while the share who would rent increased to 30 percent.

The Economy and Household Finances

  • The share of respondents who say the economy is on the right track held steady at 40 percent.
  • The percentage of respondents who expect their personal financial situation to get better over the next 12 months increased to 45 percent.
  • The share of respondents who say their household income is significantly higher than it was 12 months ago remained at 25 percent.
  • The share of respondents who say their household expenses are significantly higher than they were 12 months ago fell slightly to 36 percent.

The most detailed consumer attitudinal survey of its kind, the Fannie Mae National Housing Survey polled 1,000 Americans via live telephone interview to assess their attitudes toward owning and renting a home, home and rental price changes, homeownership distress, the economy, household finances, and overall consumer confidence. Homeowners and renters are asked more than 100 questions used to track attitudinal shifts (findings are compared to the same survey conducted monthly beginning June 2010). To reflect the growing share of households with a cell phone but no landline, the National Housing Survey has increased its cell phone dialing rate to 60 percent as of October 2014. For more information, please see the Technical Notes. Fannie Mae conducts this survey and shares monthly and quarterly results so that we may help industry partners and market participants target our collective efforts to stabilize the housing market in the near-term, and provide support in the future.

For detailed findings from the October 2014 survey, as well as a podcast providing an audio synopsis of the survey results and technical notes on survey methodology and questions asked of respondents associated with each monthly indicator, please visit the Fannie Mae Monthly National Housing Survey page on fanniemae.com. Also available on the site are in-depth topic analyses, which provide a detailed assessment of combined data results from three monthly studies. The October 2014 Fannie Mae National Housing Survey was conducted between October 1, 2014 and October 25, 2014. Most of the data collection occurred during the first two weeks of this period. Interviews were conducted by Penn Schoen Berland, in coordination with Fannie Mae.

Opinions, analyses, estimates, forecasts, and other views of Fannie Mae’s Economic & Strategic Research (ESR) Group included in these materials should not be construed as indicating Fannie Mae’s business prospects or expected results, are based on a number of assumptions, and are subject to change without notice. How this information affects Fannie Mae will depend on many factors. Although the ESR Group bases its opinions, analyses, estimates, forecasts, and other views on information it considers reliable, it does not guarantee that the information provided in these materials is accurate, current, or suitable for any particular purpose. Changes in the assumptions or the information underlying these views could produce materially different results. The analyses, opinions, estimates, forecasts, and other views published by the ESR Group represent the views of that group as of the date indicated and do not necessarily represent the views of Fannie Mae or its management.

Fannie Mae enables people to buy, refinance, or rent a home.

Visit us at http://www.fanniemae.com/progress.

Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/FannieMae.

SOURCE:

Fannie Mae http://www.fanniemae.com

 

Survey Finds Banking Experience is Improving, But Consumers Are Missing Easy Savings Opportunities

Despite having a checking account, 22 percent of Americans report using alternative banking products like cash checking services

CHERRY HILL, N.J., Sept. 25, 2014, TD Bank, America’s Most Convenient Bank®, today released its second annual TD Bank Checking Experience Index, which found that the banking experience of Americans has improved year over year. According to the Index, 86 percent of consumers rate their day-to-day experience with their checking account as excellent or very good (compared to 83 percent in 2013) and 85 percent of consumers say their bank is excellent or very good when it comes to accessibility (compared to 83 percent in 2013). The TD Bank Checking Experience Index is a nationwide survey of more than 1,500 consumers with checking accounts at various financial institutions.

Although consumers are generally happy with the services provided by their banks, 22 percent of survey respondents with a bank account say that over the last three months they have used alternative banking products such as check cashing services (12 percent), money transfer agents (11 percent) and payday loans (4 percent). When bank customers were asked why they used alternative banking products, 16 percent said they did not have a particular reason for using non-bank financial services.

“One in five consumers with a bank account are using alternative banking products, which could add needless cost to their monthly budget,” said Ryan Bailey, Executive Vice President, Head of Retail Deposit and Payment Products, TD Bank. “Consumers who are using these types of services should have a conversation with a banker to learn about less expensive financial products that can meet their everyday financial needs.”

Banking Behaviors Continue to Evolve Debit cards and online banking play central roles in the banking behaviors of today’s consumers. A large percentage of those surveyed reported that their experiences with debit cards and online banking are excellent or very good (92 percent and 91 percent, respectively). Of the 23 banking transactions that checking account holders report making each month, on average, 10 are debit card purchases and six are conducted through online banking.

Across all survey respondents, 60 percent of checking account owners said their debit card is an essential service. An even larger number of Millennials (74 percent) can’t imagine not having a debit card. When it comes to online baking, 51 percent of consumers cite it as their preferred channel to conduct checking account transactions.

While services like debit cards and online banking are both vital, the Index found that a personal connection remains important to consumers. When asked about the last time they had a question or concern regarding their checking account, the majority of respondents still rely on a telephone call or a visit to a bank location to have questions answered. However, behaviors are evolving. Telephone outreach for issue resolution grew almost 9 percent over the past year (34 percent in 2013 vs. 37 percent in 2014) and in-person resolution at a bank location declined by 15 percent (40 percent in 2013 vs. 34 percent in 2014).

Triggers for Switching Banks Include Life Events and Fees The TD Index data also reveals that fees and life events remain major triggers for changing banks. More than one third (38 percent) say they would close their primary checking account or consider leaving their bank because of fees. However, only eight percent of respondents had closed or switched their primary checking account in the past two years, down from 12 percent in the 2013. Of the eight percent of respondents who reported closing or switching checking accounts in the past two years, the main reason for doing so was a life event such as moving (29 percent), followed by bank fees (27 percent).

Advice for Consumers Based on the results of the Index, Bailey offered advice to help consumers improve their banking experience while getting the most out of their checking accounts:

  • With 60 percent of Americans saying they can’t imagine not having a debit card, consumers should have a plan of action if their card is misplaced or stolen. They should check to see if their bank offers on-the-spot debit card replacement and access to 24/7 customer service.
  • Only 13 percent of Americans are using reloadable prepaid cards. This relatively new product category offers many of the benefits of a checking account, such as the ability to receive a paycheck through direct deposit and to make purchases online, and can serve as an introduction to banking for the population that currently depends on alternative financial service providers.
  • Nearly two thirds (62 percent) of Americans say their bank is offering products and services that take advantage of new technologies like mobile apps and mobile deposit. That means that 38 percent of account holders may not be enjoying the conveniences that modern banks are providing. Consumers who want access to the latest banking technologies may want to consider trying a bank that offers their customers the ability to manage their finances in more ways.

Survey Methodology The study was conducted among a nationally representative group of consumers from August 25 through September 1, 2014. The sample size of 1,510 consumers has a margin of error of +/- 2.5 percent. The survey was hosted by global research company Angus Reid Public Opinion.

About Angus Reid Public Opinion Angus Reid Public Opinion is the Public Affairs practice of Vision Critical—a global research company. Vision Critical is a leader in the use of the Internet and rich media technology to collect high-quality, in-depth insights for a wide array of clients.

About TD Bank, America’s Most Convenient Bank TD Bank, America’s Most Convenient Bank, is one of the 10 largest banks in the U.S., providing more than 8 million customers with a full range of retail, small business and commercial banking products and services at approximately 1,300 convenient locations throughout the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, Metro D.C., the Carolinas and Florida. In addition, TD Bank and its subsidiaries offer customized private banking and wealth management services through TD Wealth®, and vehicle financing and dealer commercial services through TD Auto Finance. TD Bank is headquartered in Cherry Hill, N.J. To learn more, visit www.tdbank.com. Find TD Bank on Facebook at www.facebook.com/TDBank and on Twitter at www.twitter.com/TDBank_US.

TD Bank, America’s Most Convenient Bank, is a member of TD Bank Group and a subsidiary of The Toronto-Dominion Bank of Toronto, Canada, a top 10 financial services company in North America. The Toronto-Dominion Bank trades on the New York and Toronto stock exchanges under the ticker symbol “TD”. To learn more, visit www.td.com.

SOURCE:

http://www.td.com

 

Zillow Ranks Top Places Where Mom-and-Pop Landlords Make the Most Money

Homeowners turned landlords are most profitable in Oklahoma City, Okla. in short-term profit; San Jose, Calif., in the long-term profit, according to a Zillow Rentals Analysis

SEATTLE, Aug. 15, 2014, Zillow today named the Oklahoma City area the top place where mom-and-pop landlords stand to make the most money on their rental property on a month-to-month basis.  A Zillow Rentals analysisi looked at the top 50 U.S metros to determine which areas provide the best short-term return on investment for landlords. Rental property owners in the Oklahoma City metro area can expect to profit $536 per month on the median home when comparing anticipated rental income versus their assumed monthly mortgage payment.

Mom-and-pop landlords are homeowners who have turned their personal home into a rental rather than selling it when they move.

Zillow has also named the best places for landlords interested in long-term profitsii. When looking at rental income, tax benefits and accumulated home equity (thanks to rapid home value appreciation), landlords in San Jose, California, make the most money: $8,927 per month, or $107,122 per year. The majority of this “profit” is derived from earned but unrealized equity distributed evenly each month over the next six years. Most, if not all, of this profit will not be realized until the landlord sells the property.

“When deciding if they should sell their home or rent it out, most mom-and-pop landlords are primarily concerned with whether or not they can cover their mortgage payment each month – they simply can’t absorb monthly losses like professional investors,” said Zillow Chief Economist Dr. Stan Humphries. “However, the greatest returns are actually in markets like San Jose and San Francisco where there are short-term monthly losses, but the long-term earned equity makes them the best markets to invest in.”

Nationally, the Zillow Rent Index has increased 2.5 percent since June 2013 and 9.1 percent since June 2011. On a local level, the Zillow Rent Index has gone up as much as two to three times that amount over the past year in rental hotspots such as metro Chicago (+6.3 percent) and San Francisco (+11 percent).

The full list of best places to own a rental property can be found by visiting Zillow Real Estate Research.

Top 10 Markets for Short-term Financial Gain (difference between rent and mortgage payment on the median home, accounting for property and income taxes, maintenance and vacancy)

Release contains wide tables. View fullscreen.

Rank Metro Area Short-term profit (monthly) Short-term profit (annually)
1. Oklahoma City $536 $6,431
2. Miami-Fort Lauderdale, Fla. $515 $6,184
3. Tulsa, Okla. $396 $4,753
4. Cincinnati $385 $4,621
5. Denver $355 $4,258
6. Rochester, N.Y. $349 $4,182
7. Tampa, Fla. $287 $3,448
8. Dallas-Fort Worth, Tex. $264 $3,166
9. Indianapolis $251 $3,014
10. Memphis, Tenn. $242 $2,901
11-50 Can be found by visiting: http://www.zillow.com/research/landlord-profit-7357/

Top 10 Markets for Long-term Financial Gain (includes home equity gains, tax benefits, and the difference between monthly rental income and mortgage payments after holding onto the property for six years on the median home. Also accounting for property/income taxes, maintenance and vacancy)

Release contains wide tables. View fullscreen.

Rank Metro Area Long-term profit (monthly) Long-term profit (annually)
1. San Jose, Calif. $8,927 $107,122
2. San Francisco $6,078 $72,939
3. Los Angeles $4,328 $51,938
4. San Diego $4,165 $49,983
5. Riverside, Calif. $3,659 $43,907
6. New York $3,179 $38,147
7. Boston $3,009 $36,109
8. Seattle $2,861 $34,335
9. Sacramento, Calif. $2,694 $32,328
10. Honolulu $2,512 $30,144
11-50 Can be found by visiting: http://www.zillow.com/research/landlord-profit-7357/

About Zillow, Inc.

Zillow, Inc. (NASDAQ: Z) operates the largest home-related marketplaces on mobile and the Web, with a complementary portfolio of brands and products that help people find vital information about homes, and connect with the best local professionals. In addition, Zillow operates an industry-leading economics and analytics bureau led by Zillow’s Chief Economist Dr. Stan Humphries. Dr. Humphries and his team of economists and data analysts produce extensive housing data and research covering more than 450 markets at Zillow Real Estate Research. Zillow also sponsors the quarterly Zillow Home Price Expectations Survey, which asks more than 100 leading economists, real estate experts and investment and market strategists to predict the path of the Zillow Home Value Index over the next five years. Zillow also sponsors the bi-annual Zillow Housing Confidence Index (ZHCI) which measures consumer confidence in local housing markets, both currently and over time. The Zillow, Inc. portfolio includes Zillow.com®, Zillow Mobile, Zillow Mortgage Zillow Rentals, Zillow Digs®, Postlets®, Diverse Solutions®, Agentfolio®, Mortech®, HotPads™, StreetEasy® and Retsly™. The company is headquartered in Seattle.

Zillow.com, Zillow, Postlets, Mortech, Diverse Solutions, StreetEasy, Agentfolio and Digs are registered trademarks of Zillow, Inc. HotPads and Retsly are trademarks of Zillow, Inc.

i For short-term financial gain, Zillow identified the top places where landlords make the most money on their rental property based on several assumptions including that the median valued property was purchased five years ago in May 2009, with a 30-year fixed rate mortgage, a 20 percent down payment, and an interest rate of 4.5 percent, roughly the rate that prevailed at the time. For tax purposes we assume that the homeowner is married with a gross annual income equal to the metro-area median and that the property is vacant at a rate equal to the metro-area average vacancy rate. Finally, we assess the net profit excluding equity earned if the homeowner rents out the property for an additional seven years during which home values and rents increase at their historic rates.

ii For long-term financial gain Zillow identified the top places where landlords make the most money on their rental property based on several assumptions including that the median valued property was purchased five years ago in May 2009, with a 30-year fixed rate mortgage, a 20 percent down payment, and an interest rate of 4.5 percent, roughly the rate that prevailed at the time. For tax purposes we assume that the homeowner is married with a gross annual income equal to the metro-area median and that the property is vacant at a rate equal to the metro-area average vacancy rate. Finally, we assess the net profit and accumulated home equity if the homeowner rents out the property for an additional seven years during which home values and rents increase at their historic rates.

SOURCE:

Zillow, Inc. http://www.zillow.com

 

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