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A “financialist” versus an “economist”

According to Dr. Anthony Criniti, a “financialist” and an “economist” are two distinct terms. His definitions are below for your convenience:

“A financialist is a scientist who specializes in the science of finance.” (Criniti, The Necessity of Finance, 25)

Conversely,

“The science of economics has a name for its specialists called economists.” (Criniti, The Necessity of Finance, 25)

For more information, please read Dr. Criniti’s The Necessity of Finance.

Source:

Criniti, Anthony M. IV, The Necessity of Finance: An Overview of the Science of Management of Wealth for an Individual, a Group, or an Organization (Philadelphia: Criniti Publishing, 2013).

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American Psychological Association Survey Shows Money Stress Weighing on Americans’ Health Nationwide

Stress in America™ survey finds parents, younger generations and lower-income households have higher stress than others overall

WASHINGTON, February 4, 2015, While aspects of the U.S. economy have improved, money continues to be a top cause of stress for Americans, according to the new Stress in America™: Paying With Our Health survey released today by the American Psychological Association. According to the survey, parents, younger generations and those living in lower-income households report higher levels of stress than Americans overall, especially when it comes to stress about money.

“Regardless of the economic climate, money and finances have remained the top stressor since our survey began in 2007. Furthermore, this year’s survey shows that stress related to financial issues could have a significant impact on Americans’ health and well-being,” APA CEO and Executive Vice President Norman B. Anderson, PhD, said.

The survey, which was conducted by Harris Poll on behalf of APA among 3,068 adults in August 2014, found that 72 percent of Americans reported feeling stressed about money at least some of the time during the past month. Twenty-two percent said that they experienced extreme stress about money during the past month (an 8, 9 or 10 on a 10-point scale, where 1 is “little or no stress” and 10 is “a great deal of stress”). For the majority of Americans (64 percent), money is a somewhat or very significant source of stress, but especially for parents and younger adults (77 percent of parents, 75 percent of millennials [18 to 35 years old] and 76 percent of Gen Xers [36 to 49 years old]).

A gap also appears to be emerging in stress levels between people living in lower-income (making less than $50,000 per year) and higher-income households that mirrors the growing wealth gap nationwide. In 2007, there was no difference in reported average stress levels between those who earned more and those who earned less than $50,000, with both groups reporting the same average levels of stress (6.2 on a 10-point scale). By 2014, a clear gap had emerged with those living in lower-income households reporting higher overall stress levels than those living in higher-income households (5.2 vs. 4.7 on the 10-point scale).

Stress about money and finances appears to have a significant impact on many Americans’ lives. Some are putting their health care needs on hold because of financial concerns. Nearly 1 in 5 Americans say that they have either considered skipping (9 percent) or skipped (12 percent) going to the doctor when they needed health care because of financial concerns. Stress about money also impacts relationships: Almost a third of adults with partners (31 percent) report that money is a major source of conflict in their relationship.

The report also uncovered good news about stress management. Americans who say they have someone they can ask for emotional support, such as family and friends, report lower stress levels and better related outcomes than those without emotional support. Unfortunately, some Americans say that they do not have anyone to rely on for emotional support. According to the survey, 43 percent of those who say they have no emotional support report that their overall stress has increased in the past year, compared with 26 percent of those who say they have emotional support.

On average, Americans’ stress levels are trending downward: The average reported stress level is 4.9 on a 10-point scale, down from 6.2 in 2007. Regardless of lower stress levels, it appears that Americans are living with stress levels higher than what we believe to be healthy — 3.7 on a 10-point scale — and some (22 percent) say they are not doing enough to manage their stress.

“This year’s survey continues to reinforce the idea that we are living with a level of stress that we consider too high,” Anderson said. “Despite the good news that overall stress levels are down, it appears that the idea of living with stress higher than what we believe to be healthy and dealing with it in ineffective ways continues to be embedded in our culture. All Americans, and particularly those groups that are most affected by stress — which include women, younger adults and those with lower incomes — need to address this issue sooner than later in order to better their health and well-being.”

To read the full Stress in America report or download graphics, visit the webpage.

For additional information on stress, lifestyle and behaviors, visit the APA Help Center webpage and read APA’s Mind/Body Health campaign blog. Join the conversation about stress on Twitter by following @APAHelpCenter and #stressAPA.

Methodology

The Stress in America survey was conducted online within the United States by Harris Poll on behalf of the American Psychological Association between Aug. 4 and 29, 2014, among 3,068 adults ages 18 and older who reside in the U.S. Because the sample is based on those who were invited and agreed to participate in the Harris Poll online research panel, no estimates of theoretical sampling error can be calculated. To read the full methodology, including the weighting variables, visit the Stress in America Press Room webpage.

The American Psychological Association, in Washington, D.C., is the largest scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States. APA’s membership includes nearly 130,000 researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants and students. Through its divisions in 54 subfields of psychology and affiliations with 60 state, territorial and Canadian provincial associations, APA works to advance the creation, communication and application of psychological knowledge to benefit society and improve people’s lives.

 

 

SOURCE:

 

APA

http://www.apa.org

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Survey Finds Banking Experience is Improving, But Consumers Are Missing Easy Savings Opportunities

Despite having a checking account, 22 percent of Americans report using alternative banking products like cash checking services

CHERRY HILL, N.J., Sept. 25, 2014, TD Bank, America’s Most Convenient Bank®, today released its second annual TD Bank Checking Experience Index, which found that the banking experience of Americans has improved year over year. According to the Index, 86 percent of consumers rate their day-to-day experience with their checking account as excellent or very good (compared to 83 percent in 2013) and 85 percent of consumers say their bank is excellent or very good when it comes to accessibility (compared to 83 percent in 2013). The TD Bank Checking Experience Index is a nationwide survey of more than 1,500 consumers with checking accounts at various financial institutions.

Although consumers are generally happy with the services provided by their banks, 22 percent of survey respondents with a bank account say that over the last three months they have used alternative banking products such as check cashing services (12 percent), money transfer agents (11 percent) and payday loans (4 percent). When bank customers were asked why they used alternative banking products, 16 percent said they did not have a particular reason for using non-bank financial services.

“One in five consumers with a bank account are using alternative banking products, which could add needless cost to their monthly budget,” said Ryan Bailey, Executive Vice President, Head of Retail Deposit and Payment Products, TD Bank. “Consumers who are using these types of services should have a conversation with a banker to learn about less expensive financial products that can meet their everyday financial needs.”

Banking Behaviors Continue to Evolve Debit cards and online banking play central roles in the banking behaviors of today’s consumers. A large percentage of those surveyed reported that their experiences with debit cards and online banking are excellent or very good (92 percent and 91 percent, respectively). Of the 23 banking transactions that checking account holders report making each month, on average, 10 are debit card purchases and six are conducted through online banking.

Across all survey respondents, 60 percent of checking account owners said their debit card is an essential service. An even larger number of Millennials (74 percent) can’t imagine not having a debit card. When it comes to online baking, 51 percent of consumers cite it as their preferred channel to conduct checking account transactions.

While services like debit cards and online banking are both vital, the Index found that a personal connection remains important to consumers. When asked about the last time they had a question or concern regarding their checking account, the majority of respondents still rely on a telephone call or a visit to a bank location to have questions answered. However, behaviors are evolving. Telephone outreach for issue resolution grew almost 9 percent over the past year (34 percent in 2013 vs. 37 percent in 2014) and in-person resolution at a bank location declined by 15 percent (40 percent in 2013 vs. 34 percent in 2014).

Triggers for Switching Banks Include Life Events and Fees The TD Index data also reveals that fees and life events remain major triggers for changing banks. More than one third (38 percent) say they would close their primary checking account or consider leaving their bank because of fees. However, only eight percent of respondents had closed or switched their primary checking account in the past two years, down from 12 percent in the 2013. Of the eight percent of respondents who reported closing or switching checking accounts in the past two years, the main reason for doing so was a life event such as moving (29 percent), followed by bank fees (27 percent).

Advice for Consumers Based on the results of the Index, Bailey offered advice to help consumers improve their banking experience while getting the most out of their checking accounts:

  • With 60 percent of Americans saying they can’t imagine not having a debit card, consumers should have a plan of action if their card is misplaced or stolen. They should check to see if their bank offers on-the-spot debit card replacement and access to 24/7 customer service.
  • Only 13 percent of Americans are using reloadable prepaid cards. This relatively new product category offers many of the benefits of a checking account, such as the ability to receive a paycheck through direct deposit and to make purchases online, and can serve as an introduction to banking for the population that currently depends on alternative financial service providers.
  • Nearly two thirds (62 percent) of Americans say their bank is offering products and services that take advantage of new technologies like mobile apps and mobile deposit. That means that 38 percent of account holders may not be enjoying the conveniences that modern banks are providing. Consumers who want access to the latest banking technologies may want to consider trying a bank that offers their customers the ability to manage their finances in more ways.

Survey Methodology The study was conducted among a nationally representative group of consumers from August 25 through September 1, 2014. The sample size of 1,510 consumers has a margin of error of +/- 2.5 percent. The survey was hosted by global research company Angus Reid Public Opinion.

About Angus Reid Public Opinion Angus Reid Public Opinion is the Public Affairs practice of Vision Critical—a global research company. Vision Critical is a leader in the use of the Internet and rich media technology to collect high-quality, in-depth insights for a wide array of clients.

About TD Bank, America’s Most Convenient Bank TD Bank, America’s Most Convenient Bank, is one of the 10 largest banks in the U.S., providing more than 8 million customers with a full range of retail, small business and commercial banking products and services at approximately 1,300 convenient locations throughout the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, Metro D.C., the Carolinas and Florida. In addition, TD Bank and its subsidiaries offer customized private banking and wealth management services through TD Wealth®, and vehicle financing and dealer commercial services through TD Auto Finance. TD Bank is headquartered in Cherry Hill, N.J. To learn more, visit www.tdbank.com. Find TD Bank on Facebook at www.facebook.com/TDBank and on Twitter at www.twitter.com/TDBank_US.

TD Bank, America’s Most Convenient Bank, is a member of TD Bank Group and a subsidiary of The Toronto-Dominion Bank of Toronto, Canada, a top 10 financial services company in North America. The Toronto-Dominion Bank trades on the New York and Toronto stock exchanges under the ticker symbol “TD”. To learn more, visit www.td.com.

SOURCE:

http://www.td.com

 

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Zillow Ranks Top Places Where Mom-and-Pop Landlords Make the Most Money

Homeowners turned landlords are most profitable in Oklahoma City, Okla. in short-term profit; San Jose, Calif., in the long-term profit, according to a Zillow Rentals Analysis

SEATTLE, Aug. 15, 2014, Zillow today named the Oklahoma City area the top place where mom-and-pop landlords stand to make the most money on their rental property on a month-to-month basis.  A Zillow Rentals analysisi looked at the top 50 U.S metros to determine which areas provide the best short-term return on investment for landlords. Rental property owners in the Oklahoma City metro area can expect to profit $536 per month on the median home when comparing anticipated rental income versus their assumed monthly mortgage payment.

Mom-and-pop landlords are homeowners who have turned their personal home into a rental rather than selling it when they move.

Zillow has also named the best places for landlords interested in long-term profitsii. When looking at rental income, tax benefits and accumulated home equity (thanks to rapid home value appreciation), landlords in San Jose, California, make the most money: $8,927 per month, or $107,122 per year. The majority of this “profit” is derived from earned but unrealized equity distributed evenly each month over the next six years. Most, if not all, of this profit will not be realized until the landlord sells the property.

“When deciding if they should sell their home or rent it out, most mom-and-pop landlords are primarily concerned with whether or not they can cover their mortgage payment each month – they simply can’t absorb monthly losses like professional investors,” said Zillow Chief Economist Dr. Stan Humphries. “However, the greatest returns are actually in markets like San Jose and San Francisco where there are short-term monthly losses, but the long-term earned equity makes them the best markets to invest in.”

Nationally, the Zillow Rent Index has increased 2.5 percent since June 2013 and 9.1 percent since June 2011. On a local level, the Zillow Rent Index has gone up as much as two to three times that amount over the past year in rental hotspots such as metro Chicago (+6.3 percent) and San Francisco (+11 percent).

The full list of best places to own a rental property can be found by visiting Zillow Real Estate Research.

Top 10 Markets for Short-term Financial Gain (difference between rent and mortgage payment on the median home, accounting for property and income taxes, maintenance and vacancy)

Release contains wide tables. View fullscreen.

Rank Metro Area Short-term profit (monthly) Short-term profit (annually)
1. Oklahoma City $536 $6,431
2. Miami-Fort Lauderdale, Fla. $515 $6,184
3. Tulsa, Okla. $396 $4,753
4. Cincinnati $385 $4,621
5. Denver $355 $4,258
6. Rochester, N.Y. $349 $4,182
7. Tampa, Fla. $287 $3,448
8. Dallas-Fort Worth, Tex. $264 $3,166
9. Indianapolis $251 $3,014
10. Memphis, Tenn. $242 $2,901
11-50 Can be found by visiting: http://www.zillow.com/research/landlord-profit-7357/

Top 10 Markets for Long-term Financial Gain (includes home equity gains, tax benefits, and the difference between monthly rental income and mortgage payments after holding onto the property for six years on the median home. Also accounting for property/income taxes, maintenance and vacancy)

Release contains wide tables. View fullscreen.

Rank Metro Area Long-term profit (monthly) Long-term profit (annually)
1. San Jose, Calif. $8,927 $107,122
2. San Francisco $6,078 $72,939
3. Los Angeles $4,328 $51,938
4. San Diego $4,165 $49,983
5. Riverside, Calif. $3,659 $43,907
6. New York $3,179 $38,147
7. Boston $3,009 $36,109
8. Seattle $2,861 $34,335
9. Sacramento, Calif. $2,694 $32,328
10. Honolulu $2,512 $30,144
11-50 Can be found by visiting: http://www.zillow.com/research/landlord-profit-7357/

About Zillow, Inc.

Zillow, Inc. (NASDAQ: Z) operates the largest home-related marketplaces on mobile and the Web, with a complementary portfolio of brands and products that help people find vital information about homes, and connect with the best local professionals. In addition, Zillow operates an industry-leading economics and analytics bureau led by Zillow’s Chief Economist Dr. Stan Humphries. Dr. Humphries and his team of economists and data analysts produce extensive housing data and research covering more than 450 markets at Zillow Real Estate Research. Zillow also sponsors the quarterly Zillow Home Price Expectations Survey, which asks more than 100 leading economists, real estate experts and investment and market strategists to predict the path of the Zillow Home Value Index over the next five years. Zillow also sponsors the bi-annual Zillow Housing Confidence Index (ZHCI) which measures consumer confidence in local housing markets, both currently and over time. The Zillow, Inc. portfolio includes Zillow.com®, Zillow Mobile, Zillow Mortgage Zillow Rentals, Zillow Digs®, Postlets®, Diverse Solutions®, Agentfolio®, Mortech®, HotPads™, StreetEasy® and Retsly™. The company is headquartered in Seattle.

Zillow.com, Zillow, Postlets, Mortech, Diverse Solutions, StreetEasy, Agentfolio and Digs are registered trademarks of Zillow, Inc. HotPads and Retsly are trademarks of Zillow, Inc.

i For short-term financial gain, Zillow identified the top places where landlords make the most money on their rental property based on several assumptions including that the median valued property was purchased five years ago in May 2009, with a 30-year fixed rate mortgage, a 20 percent down payment, and an interest rate of 4.5 percent, roughly the rate that prevailed at the time. For tax purposes we assume that the homeowner is married with a gross annual income equal to the metro-area median and that the property is vacant at a rate equal to the metro-area average vacancy rate. Finally, we assess the net profit excluding equity earned if the homeowner rents out the property for an additional seven years during which home values and rents increase at their historic rates.

ii For long-term financial gain Zillow identified the top places where landlords make the most money on their rental property based on several assumptions including that the median valued property was purchased five years ago in May 2009, with a 30-year fixed rate mortgage, a 20 percent down payment, and an interest rate of 4.5 percent, roughly the rate that prevailed at the time. For tax purposes we assume that the homeowner is married with a gross annual income equal to the metro-area median and that the property is vacant at a rate equal to the metro-area average vacancy rate. Finally, we assess the net profit and accumulated home equity if the homeowner rents out the property for an additional seven years during which home values and rents increase at their historic rates.

SOURCE:

Zillow, Inc. http://www.zillow.com

 

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Transamerica Retirement Solutions Today Honored Financial Educators of the Year

Inaugural awards ceremony recognized outstanding financial advisors who help increase financial literacy for their communities and clients

HARRISON, New York, April 25, 2014, Transamerica Retirement Solutions today recognized two financial advisors with its inaugural Transamerica Financial Educators Award.  The awards ceremony took place during Transamerica’s second annual Retirement Readiness Summit (April 23-25) and coincides with National Financial Educators Day on April 25.

The awards acknowledged the work of two financial advisors whose efforts to improve financial literacy have positively impacted their communities and clients – Tom Hoffman with Lincoln Investment Planning, Inc. and Jania Stout with the Fiduciary Consulting Group at PSA.

Mr. Hoffman received the Transamerica Financial Educators Award for community education for his outstanding educational outreach to high school students in Massachusetts. Through his successful, community-based financial education program, local high school students have learned real-world financial management skills such as how to create a budget and manage financial events like unforeseen health expenses.

Ms. Stout received the Transamerica Financial Educators Award for employee engagement for her unique educational program for retirement plan participants. To address the challenge of low retirement savings rates among U.S. workers, Ms. Stout developed the Retirement HERO Program to provide an easy-to-understand method of saving for retirement. Ms. Stout’s four-step program encourages workers to have a budget, eliminate debt, know their retirement number, and own their plan.

A special Financial Education Leadership Award was also presented by the National Financial Educators Council to Deb Rubin, senior vice president of TPA and specialist advisor distribution for Transamerica Retirement Solutions, for her leadership and dedication to improving retirement outcomes for American workers.

“Financial education is an integral part of any effort to help American workers achieve a secure retirement. Transamerica is proud to recognize the winners of the Transamerica Financial Educators Award for their efforts to increase financial literacy in their communities,” said Stig Nybo, president of pension sales and distribution for Transamerica Retirement Solutions. “We’re especially proud of Transamerica’s Deb Rubin. She is passionate about improving financial security and her work to promote the importance of financial education will help create better retirement outcomes for many Americans.”

Transamerica is currently accepting nominations for the 2015 Transamerica Financial Educators Award.  To submit a nomination, apply online at trsretire.com.

About Transamerica Retirement Solutions

Transamerica Retirement Solutions (Transamerica) is a leading provider of customized retirement plan solutions for small to large organizations.

Transamerica partners with financial advisors, third party administrators, and consultants to cover the entire spectrum of defined benefit and defined contribution plans, including: 401(k) and 403(b) (Traditional and Roth); 457; profit sharing; money purchase; cash balance; Taft-Hartley; multiple employer plans; nonqualified deferred compensation; and rollover and Roth IRAs.

Transamerica helps more than three million retirement plan participants save and invest wisely to secure their retirement dreams. For more information about Transamerica Retirement Solutions Corporation, please visit trsretire.com.

About The National Financial Educators Council

The National Financial Educators Council is a personal finance company dedicated to creating a world where people are informed to make qualified financial decisions that improve their lives, the lives of their loved ones, and the lives of people they impact around the globe. The NFEC promotes advocacy campaigns, sets standards, conducts research and shares best practices that further the financial literacy movement.  Learn more at FinancialEducatorsCouncil.org.

Transamerica Retirement Solutions Corporation is not affiliated with the National Financial Educators Council.

15378-PR  (4/14)

Media inquiries

Hank Williams Phone: +1-319-355-7789 Email: hank.williams@transamerica.com

Julie Quinlan Phone: +1-213-742-5134 Email: julie.quinlan@transamerica.com

 

SOURCE:

Aegon N.V.

 

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The following is a review from Kirkus Reviews of The Most Important Lessons in Economics and Finance Book by Dr. Anthony M. Criniti IV.  Please feel free to add a review of this book also.

“Criniti (The Necessity of Finance, 2013) interprets the key concepts underlying economic and financial behavior, with an emphasis on personal finance.

Criniti makes frequent references to his previous book as he guides the reader through 218 principles of economics and finance that he finds to be both essential and universally applicable. His claim that “around the 1950s it became formally necessary to create finance, the science of managing wealth for an individual, a group, or an organization” may raise the eyebrows of readers familiar with a longer span of history, but it does allow readers to understand what exactly the author means by “finance.” Most of the principles identified in the book relate to matters of personal finance—spending, saving, retirement—and business operations. Some of the principles Criniti explores are reasonable if somewhat simplistic guidelines: “Always keeping your promises can help you to keep your good reputation.” and “Only give gifts that you can afford to give.” Others require greater leaps of logic or adherence to a profit-driven worldview: “Economic cycles are naturally required wealth adjustments by economic entities.”; “Some people will do anything to deprive you of your wealth.” Some principles merit two pages of explanation, while others are dispatched in a paragraph or two; the explanations are derived more from the author’s understanding of his principles than from empirical evidence or analysis. The principle that “Wealth is attracted to cities,” for instance, is supported by no data, merely the claim that “In general, you will find your greatest opportunities to build wealth in cities versus suburbia or the country.” Although the title suggests an introductory economics course, the readers who will find the greatest value here are those in search of a more philosophical companion for their personal finance handbooks.

A guide to the fundamental principles of building and maintaining personal wealth, relying more on the author’s instinct than on quantitative data.”

Kirkus Reviews

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Experienced financial professional shares reader-friendly guide to economics, finance

 In “The Most Important Lessons in Economics and Finance,” Dr. Anthony M. Criniti IV uncovers the time-tested secrets of wealth management

PHILADELPHIA – In “The Necessity of Finance” he laid a foundation, introducing readers to the characteristics of the economic and financial worlds. Now, after multiple requests, Dr. Anthony M. Criniti IV is back with a follow-up book, “The Most Important Lessons in Economics and Finance” (ISBN 0988459523), uncovering the most significant truths of these two important sciences.

Dr. Criniti knows that reading these principles alone is not enough to master them; after many years of experience in the financial field, he knows that you must incorporate the lessons into your life while making the decision to take control of your own wealth—a process that can take a long time. But this helpful guide provides the best place to start, particularly for advanced level students and professionals who have already read “The Necessity of Finance.”

Through incorporating and summarizing the teachings of some of history’s top contributors to these two sciences, Dr. Criniti draws upon a wealth of experience to pass these lessons on to the next generation of practitioners in the worlds of economics and finance.

“I give these lessons to you from the bottom of my heart, with the best intentions, to reveal the secrets of two of the most important sciences….Mastery may take decades, but choosing not to try to master your own wealth can result in harsh consequences, as noted in my previous work,” says author Dr. Criniti.

The Most Important Lessons in Economics and Finance” is available for sale online at Amazon.com and other channels.

About the Author:

DR. ANTHONY M. CRINITI IV is a former financial consultant and a current professor of finance at several universities. He earned a PhD in applied management and decision sciences, with a concentration in finance. A native of Philadelphia, he has also received many financially related designations, including CHFC, CLU, REBC, and RHU. Dr. Criniti is an active investor and has traveled the world studying various aspects of finance. He is also the author of the acclaimed finance book, The Necessity of Finance. Finally, Dr. Criniti has just released his new book, The Most Important Lessons in Economics and Finance.

MEDIA CONTACT:

Dr. Anthony M. Criniti IV

E-mail               info@learn-about-finance.com

Web:                https://learn-about-finance.com/

REVIEW COPIES AND INTERVIEWS MAY BE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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